Students Discuss Free Speech on Campus

ZOE ROHRICH, FEATURES EDITOR | TUESDAY, MAY 2, 2017

Free speech has become a hotly contested topic among colleges across the country, sparking a national evaluation of how much political diversity should be present on American campuses. Bard College is no exception, with a similar controversy currently underway within its community.

Last Wednesday, the conservative commentator Ann Coulter announced that she would cancel her planned speech at the University of California Berkeley due to the loss of conservative sponsorship, as well as for personal safety reasons. In a message to The New York Times, Coulter responded, “It’s a sad day for free speech.” Continue reading “Students Discuss Free Speech on Campus”

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Freshman Responds to Fraternity Confusion

NICK JEBSEN, NEWS EDITOR | MONDAY, MARCH 6, 2017

Freshman Edwar Aviles-Mercedes and five of his close friends have started a club resembling a fraternity called Alpha Theta Kappa. As of February 17th it is an officially sanctioned club, recognized and funded by Bard’s fiscal committee. 

In a statement released via email that day, the fiscal committee explained their reasoning for sanctioning and funding the club. Among the factors cited was the fact that Alpha Theta Kappa would not be permitted, based on Bard College rules, to discriminate based on gender.

Continue reading “Freshman Responds to Fraternity Confusion”

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New York Times: American Universities Must Take a Stand

 LEON BOTSTEIN ON CAMPUS FEB. 8, 2017 Not since the era of witch hunts and “red baiting” has the American university faced so great a threat from government. How is the university to function when a president’s administration blurs the distinction between fact and fiction by asserting the existence of “alternative facts”? How can the university turn a blind eye to what every historian knows to … Continue reading New York Times: American Universities Must Take a Stand

Botstein and Danner Discuss the President’s Policy and Personality

Presented by the 100 Days Initiative, human rights project, CCE, and Council for Inclusive Excellence

JOHANNA M. COSTIGAN, CO-EDITOR IN CHIEF | FEBRUARY 2, 2017

MAEVE LAZOR, CO-EDITOR IN CHIEF | FEBRUARY 2, 2017

The First 100 Days, a college-wide initiative combining civics and public media to track Trump’s first months as president, was launched last night, Thursday February 2. The event was called “Trump Abroad, Trump at Home: Declaring the New War.” President Botstein and journalist and professor Mark Danner had a conversation about Trump’s role as a domestic orator and international representative of America. They covered the extensive action taken by the President over the last two weeks–from wrongfully omitting multiple pages from the whitehouse.gov website to threatening to cut funding for UC Berkeley after its students protested his immigration order.

Continue reading “Botstein and Danner Discuss the President’s Policy and Personality”

Safe Spaces More Important Than Ever as Minorities are Treated as Second-Class Citizens in Wake of Trump Election, Part II

MAEVE LAZOR, CO-EDITOR IN CHIEF | DECEMBER 10, 2016

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In my recent op-Ed, “Safe spaces more important than ever as minorities are treated as second-class citizens in wake of Trump Election, Part I,” I took aim at the “us” versus “them” mindset that has historically divided people in terms of race, religion, and nationality.

I criticized Trump for abandoning and encouraging others to abandon the legacy of respectful, tolerant, politically correct discourse and theorized that in the wake of his election, the dearth of such rhetoric will inspire more people to commit hate crimes. There is much to criticize in PC culture itself, but its necessity should not be questioned on the campaign trail or in the highest position of office in the nation. Continue reading “Safe Spaces More Important Than Ever as Minorities are Treated as Second-Class Citizens in Wake of Trump Election, Part II”